Metrobolist 2. On the Theme of Light and Dark (Probability A)

Chapter 2 opens with a 2013 quote from The New York Review of Books.

Ian Buruma asks "So who is David Bowie?"

The chapter begins in summer 1957 when a modernist technical school building for boys is completed in Bromley's rural dormitory pocket of Keston, leaving its late Victorian fin de siĆ©cle designed technical institute in Beckenham Road with bas relief lettering of words SCIENCE, ART and TECHNICAL INSTITUTE ornamented onto the outside of the building itself. 

Joseph Jacob Welles starts his first year at the new Tech and the chapter ends in summer 1962 with Joe Welles planning to return for sixth form at the school. The school is real although names of most teachers and pupil-students of the time have been changed -- like characters in a series of dramatized 1950s schoolday plays. Not all names have been tweaked out of the real. Metrobolistic characters are not from some historical black and white children's television. Metrobolist is a colourful and entertaining parental advisory. A fiction tracking reality as documented probability. 

Here's a sample from end pages of Metrobolist 2.

One or two boys at the school were to have outstanding careers in years to come. Among them -- Roderick Nibayrks. In a very near future Roderick would move to Beckenham and Penge County Grammar School, becoming a celebrated composer of modern music. Bill Wyman was a grammar school alumnus after World war II but few had heard of the Rolling Stones in 1962. In the upper sixth at grammar, studying 'A' level English literature when Nibayrks first joined, was Marcus 'the Mint' Murray; later to become celebrated rock critic, Minty Murray.

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